Comprehensive and specialised physiotherapy services
Physio West | Headaches and Migraines | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

How’s your heart?

Why your physiotherapist wants to talk about your general health and blood pressure

I went to the GP the other day and they told that my blood pressure went up (luckily only a little bit). I had no symptoms; there was nothing to let me know that was the case. I then started thinking about what affects blood pressure; I know there are several things that can cause high blood pressure including lack of physical activity, eating lots of salt, drinking lots of alcohol, family history and stress.

Blood pressure is a measurement of how much pressure there is in your arteries when your heart is at maximal contraction (systole) over relaxation (diastole). Blood pressure of 120/80 is considered normal. Blood pressure of 120/80 up to 139/89 is considered high-normal (where I was the other day), anything over this is considered to be a condition called hypertension (high blood pressure).

When you come in to see me, no matter why you are here, I will always ask about your general health. This will include asking you about your heart. Why? Because I am treating  you as a whole person, not just your back or your ankle. Also, because some physiotherapy treatments are contraindicated (not allowed) if you are taking certain medications or if you have a pacemaker.

Having high blood pressure puts you at risk of cardiac disease, kidney conditions or stroke. What can you do to prevent high blood pressure? One thing is commence a healthy level of exercise: that is where your physiotherapist is most excited to help! Having a healthy diet, ceasing smoking and reducing alcohol intake are all important too, and we are happy to chat to you about this and refer you on to other health professionals if you need.

If you don’t know what your blood pressure is, if you haven’t had a medical assessment, I recommend you contact your GP and get started. Your GP will chat to you about any medical options available, particularly if you do have very high or low blood pressure. GP’s will often refer you to us physios to get started or improve your current level of exercise. A recent study found that Physiotherapists are a GP’s most recommended Health Professional.

While we do treat ankle strains and back pain, physiotherapy does more than this.

There is a great website where you can find out more information on how physiotherapy may help your condition – whether it’s getting your musculoskeletal or neurological condition managed, or just getting healthier! See https://choose.physio/

Physio West | Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Treatment | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Blog Prepared by Laura Hundertmark (Physiotherapist)

Do you suffer from chronic neck stiffness and pain?

Yes?

Many of us do,  but you don’t need to suffer any longer!

 

Neck pain is a significant health problem with 1 in 2 people experiencing neck pain at least once in their lifetime, according to a 2016 worldwide review.  Neck pain is often recurrent and of non-specific in nature. With most of us gazing at computers or staring down at our smart devices most of the day, it’s safe to say that stiff and painful necks are not going to go away.

 

So what can you do about it?

Here are three easy things you can do that will help:

  1. Put your computer monitor at eye level and sit up straight to avoid tilting and twisting your head down or to the side while you are on the computer.
  2. When looking at your smart device, be sure to take frequent breaks and avoid having your neck bent in any one position for long periods of time
  3. The key to relief for a stiff neck is proper and regular stretching. So try doing these simple exercises as often as you can:
    • Roll your shoulders backwards and down, hold for 10 seconds, relax, repeat 5 times
    • Squeeze your shoulder blades together, hold for 10 seconds, relax, repeat 5 times
    • Push your head backwards into car head rest or hands, hold 10 seconds, repeat 5 times
    • Bring your ear to your shoulder, hold for 10 seconds, repeat 5 times.
    • Book a head and shoulders massage and feel the relief

We would love to help you get to the bottom of your neck pain. Book online today or call 8352 3582 and make an appointment.

Physio West | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Blog prepared by: Alan Quek (Remedial Massage Therapist)

Is your car seat driving you up the wall?

When achey pains and niggles pop up, you often find yourself hunting for answers as to what could be causing the problem. One thing that is often missed, particularly with spinal pain, is the importance of your seating position while driving your car.

Driving is something that most people do every day, anywhere from 5 minutes to the local shops, to an hours commute to work. Our body loves to be kept moving, and the longer it’s left in once position, the stiffer things become. If you are poorly set up in the car, this may speed the rate at which those areas tighten up, predisposing you to picking up injuries with simple day to day tasks.

So what to look for? Here are a couple of simple tips to consider in relation to your position while sitting in your car.

  1. Adjust your wheel position
    Reaching for the wheel or sitting to close, can both alter your sitting posture in the car. Have your hands just below shoulder height, with a small bend in your elbows as you place your hands at 10 and 2 o’clock on the wheel. Your shoulder blades should sit comfortably against the backrest of the seat.

 

  1. Adjust your reach to the pedals
    Sitting too close to the pedals can cause your hips and knees to be too flexed, while reaching for them can force you to strain to get there. Similar to the arms, position your legs so they rest in a slightly flexed position, such that your knees and hips are kept roughly level.

 

  1. Adjust the seat angle
    Once again, too far in either direction can create discomfort. Too much recline will encourage your upper back and neck to poke forwards. Sitting too upright will feel rigid and restrictive. Allow a small recline enough that you can keep your shoulder blades against the chair with your bottom in the back of the seat.

 

  1. Lumbar support
    Different backs will need different degrees of support above the pelvis. Play around with the feeling of a rolled up towel in the small of your back to avoid slumping, and giving your back extra support while sitting.

 

Car Assessments are undertaken at both our Salisbury and Mile End clinics. Mention this to reception when making a booking.

 

Physio West | Workplace Injuries & Motor Vehicle Accidents | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Blog prepared by Matt Nowosilskyj (Physiotherapist)