Comprehensive and specialised physiotherapy services

The Physio Job You Don’t Want

Picture this; You are working in a practice with no other physios, you’re alone, no support, no mentoring, no one to go to and share you patient wins with. There are times when as a young physio you think, ‘Gee… I would love some help with this tricky presentation’.

You love going to the APA’s PD nights, but you would also love to learn from people every day. Your room is small, possibly even without a window. You have a small area to prescribe exercises which you know your patients won’t do. You are desperate to have a Friday night drink with colleagues. You haven’t had a holiday in ages, and your new roster means you can’t play social netball, soccer, or footy. You don’t even make it to the gym most days and are starting to be the person who will need a physio themselves.

You work, work, work, without someone saying ‘Hey, good job!’, or better still, being rewarded financially. You have this burning passion for physiotherapy, the profession, the patients, and getting great outcomes, but you can feel it slowly dying…

Sounds like you, or someone you know? Don’t let the flame blow out! There are better things on the horizon in practices that are changing the physiotherapy profession for the better!

At PhysioWest we are passionate professionals with a team first mentality. That’s why we provide:

  • Individual light filled treatment rooms
  • 200 sqm of gym space including cardio, weights, open space and Pilates studio onsite
  • Free gym access to all employees
  • Discounts on remedial massage for you and your family
  • Weekly PD sessions
  • Weekly 1:1 mentoring sessions
  • Quarterly Team Pow-Wows
  • Weekly Team Huddles
  • Regular social events
  • Designed roster to suit your life (and no Saturdays)
  • Above award salary package with an incentive package on top
  • Diversity of patients and treatment models, including telehealth
  • Not to mention the best first day!

 

Contact us now, and change your lifestyle!

 

Physio West | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Rebecca Clare
08 8352 3582
0405 112 959
bec@physiowest.net.au

Evidence-Based Remedial Massage Therapy

How To Get The Best Out Of It!

Physio West | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Massage therapy is the most popular complementary therapy used by the Australian public. With research in massage therapy gaining significant attention over the last 30 years, clinical evidence exists to support the efficacies of massage therapy on many health conditions, including chronic low back pain. This growing body of research supports massage to become an evidence-based practice.

As a remedial massage therapist at PhysioWest, while pursuing a higher research degree in low back pain, I often wonder what evidence-based practice means in remedial massage. Importantly, what does it mean to you: a person considering remedial massage, or already enjoying remedial massage at our clinic? Let me expand this topic to offer some practical tips to help you get the best out of it!

Evidence-based practice is described as the thoughtful use of the best current evidence in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. In physical therapy, which includes massage and physiotherapy, the approach integrates clinical expertise and takes patient desires, values, and needs into consideration. A study published in the May 2018 volume of the Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice Journal, states that although massage therapists in Australia have very good access to apply research evidence in their practice, the majority do not. Those that do are often those that undertake continuing professional education and are members with reputable Professional Associations.

In addition to research evidence, another form of evidence, often overlooked, is experiential evidence – that is, the clinical experience gathered by the therapist as well as the experience of the person who receives the treatment. Yes, your experience reflected back to the therapist is of crucial importance to getting the best out of evidence-based treatments!

Tips to get the most out of evidence-based practice of massage are:

  • Find and use a clinic whose practices are professionally accredited (e.g. partnered by health funds)
  • Book your massage with qualified remedial massage therapists (Diploma or higher)
  • Ask your therapist what type of massage he/she is trained in? (you want someone who can clearly explain their knowledge as applicable to you)
  • Ask if he/she is a member of an established professional association for massage therapists? (e.g. Massage and Myotherapy Australia, previously AAMT, or the Australian Natural Therapists Association, ANTA)
  • If all is safe and agreeable to your standards, trial the massage and take note of your experience during and after the massage
  • Afterwards, reflect and evaluate your “experiential evidence” on how you felt following the treatment (sometimes, the treatment plan may include 3 or more treatments)
  • Reflect and answer this for yourself: Is this treatment good for me? Trust your experiential evidence
  • If Yes, book another massage with that therapist at that clinic!

90 Years Young: A celebration

Happy 90th Birthday Paddy!

 

Paddy is an inspirational woman who has been attending PhysioWest since Grant first opened the doors. Paddy has several health conditions including Pulmonary Fibrosis and Atrial Fibrillation but that doesn’t stop her being a very active member of the community.

 

Laura and all of the team at PhysioWest would like to congratulate Paddy on all her fantastic work in the PhysioWest gym and on living with such a brilliant healthy mindset and lifestyle; Paddy you are an inspiration to us all. Paddy attends the weekly Strength and Balance Class at PhysioWest; last week class we celebrated Paddy’s birthday with a balloon game and then enjoyed a lovely cake and chocolates. See photo below of Physio Laura with her awesome balance tribe on 28th March (left to right: Sandra, Audrey, Paddy, Maria, Laura and Dawn).

Falls Prevention with Strength & Balance Training at PhysioWest

Falls happen to one third of people over 65 years of age living in the community each year (Gillespie et al 2012). Worldwide we have an ageing population; a World Health Organisation report predicted that by 2050, the number of people aged over 80 will exceed those aged under 14 years for the first time in history (WHO, 2002). This emphasises the increasing importance on geriatric health care. Active Ageing is the process of optimizing opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality of life as people age (WHO, 2002); basically staying happy and healthy as you get older.

 

Falls may have serious consequences requiring hospitalisation including hip fractures, traumatic brain injuries and upper limb fractures. Physiotherapy can help rehabilitation of these injuries, but you might not know how important physiotherapy can be in prevention of falls – stopping them before they happen!

 

Importantly, there are several risk factors which can be modified including;

  • Environmental risk factors; this means the shoes you wear, the rugs you have in your house, the lighting and flooring everywhere you go
  • Behavioural risk factors, like diet and exercise… This is where physiotherapy may be able to help you out

 

Laura, Physio, is passionate about Active Ageing and Falls Prevention. Every Wednesday at 1pm, Laura runs the Strength and Balance Class at PhysioWest. The Strength & Balance Class is evidence-based (includes interventions which are shown to be effective in the research literature). As shown by a massive Systematic Review in 2012 (included 159 trials with 79,193 participants!), multiple-component group exercise significantly reduces rate of falls and risk of falling.

 

Okay, now you know exercise is important to prevent falls, especially in those over 65 years old. But what exercise specifically?

 

Here’s exactly what will you do in the Strength & Balance Class:

  • Balance training – including exercises standing on uneven surfaces (such as air discs and wobble discs) with multi-tasking and sometimes even little pushes from Laura – Perturbation training is shown to be effective in preventing falls (Papadimitriou et al 2017)
  • Muscle strengthening exercises, using mini weights, therabands, gym balls and steps. Laura specialises in whole body strengthening and stretching exercises and can cater these exercises for all mobility levels.
  • Pilates – in the clinic it is clear that use of the Pilates equipment (reformers and trapeze table) has been great for older people, particularly those with low back pain. A low quality study in Spain supported this (Cruz-Diaz et al 2015). Physio Laura has experience and training in using Pilates for a range of neurological conditions.
  • Yoga – modified seated and standing poses with the environmental supports to challenge balance have been shown to be effective (Youkhana et al 2016)
  • Tai Chi – studies have shown Tai Chi does significantly reduce risk of falling. Laura is trained in modified Yang style Tai Chi for falls prevention and exercises may include movements sitting in chairs or standing up which will challenge muscle strength, endurance and balance.

 

If you, or someone you know, is over 65 years old and not exercising, let them know! A individualised assessment with Laura is how you can get started coming to a Strength & Balance Class.

 

Not keen on group exercise? Laura can set you up on an individualised home exercise program and see you periodically in the PhysioWest gym to refine your skills. Laura can also give you education on how you can modify environmental risk factors around your house, and also address any musculoskeletal problems you might have… For example, that really stiff ankle or arthritic knee which might be a risk factor for you losing your balance.

 

Call us today on 8352 3582 to make an appointment, get started in class or have a chat with Laura about exercises for Strength & Balance.

 

References

Cruz-Diaz D, Martinez-Amat A, de la Torre-Cruz MJ, Casuso RA, de Guevara NML, Hita-Contreras F, Effects of a six-week Pilates intervention on balance and fear of falling in women aged over 65 with chronic low-back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Maturitas 2015 Dec;82(4):371-376

Gillespie LD, Robertson MC, Gillespie WJ, Sherrington C, Gates S, Clemson LM, Lamb SE. Interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD007146. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007146.pub3.

Papadimitriou A, Perry M, A systematic review of the effects of perturbation training on preventing falls. New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy 2017 Mar;45(1):31-49

WHO Global report on falls prevention in older age, 2007

Youkhana S, Dean CM, Wolff M, Sherrington C, Tiedemann A, Yoga-based exercise improves balance and mobility in people aged 60 and over: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Age and Ageing 2016 Jan;45(1):21-29

What does the latest research say about treating low back pain?

Finding the right treatment for low back pain can be tricky, especially because there are so many different options from a wide range of health professionals and therapists. A recent study has
outlined which treatment methods have been shown to be effective in treating low back pain and the findings are summarised below:

1. Advice to remain active and education should always be provided regardless if the pain is acute or chronic

2. Exercise should always be prescribed, and it doesn’t matter what type of exercise it is

3. Hands-on therapies such as massage, joint mobilisation and manipulation can be used as an adjunctive treatment

4. Pain medication such as paracetamol and opioids should not be used to treat low back pain, whereas anti-inflammatories can be used as an adjunctive treatment

5. Low back pain should be addressed by primary care practitioners such as a GP or physiotherapist first who can screen for more serious pathologies

6. Imaging such as X-rays and MRIs are rarely necessary for most low back pain presentations

The bottom line is that if you are experiencing low back pain for either a short or long period of time, you should be trying to stay active as much as possible. You should also see a health professional or therapist such as a physiotherapist who can provide education on your condition and pain in general, prescribe exercises based on your individual needs, and treat your acute symptoms with hands-on therapy.

Let us help you find the right treatment for your pain. Make an appointment online today.

Physio West | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Blog produced by Spencer (Physiotherapist, PhysioWest)

Physio West | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Beginning in the Gym? Steps to Success

As a beginner, getting started at the gym is usually the hardest part of meeting your fitness goals. Here are a few tips for beginners to get on track to meeting your goals for the New Year and finally getting started in the gym.

1. Set S.M.A.R.T. goals
Goal setting is vital when you first start going to the gym as it gives you something to work towards. Goals need to be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely (S.M.A.R.T.). It is a lot harder to stay motivated to reach a broad goal such as “I want to get fit” when compared to a S.M.A.R.T. goal such as “I want to be able to do 10 consecutive push-ups by the end of 3 months”. S.M.A.R.T. goals allow you to measure your progress towards reaching your goals, and make any changes to your routine or seek advice if you unsure that you’re on track.

2. Consult with a health professional
Seeking advice from a health professional prior to getting started at the gym is important, particularly if you have a pre-existing medical condition that may be affected by exercise. A health professional such as a physiotherapist can offer advice on how to prevent injury if you have not been in a gym environment before.

3. Have someone look at your form
This step is particularly important if you would like to start lifting weights. It is always a good idea to seek advice from a trained professional such as a physiotherapist, exercise physiologist or a personal trainer at your gym. These professionals can offer you advice on how to perform exercises correctly, and how to prevent injury.

4. Don’t go too hard too quickly
When starting out, a big mistake that a lot of beginners make is lifting too much weight or going too hard too early. It is vital that you gradually increase the weight you lift, the time spent on the treadmill, and the amount of repetitions that you perform. This is to prevent an avoidable injury from occurring from doing too much too soon.

5. Have fun!
A great way to stay motivated for your fitness goals when first starting out is to find an exercise routine that you enjoy. Don’t be afraid to mix up your gym routine with exercises including cardio, resistance training, pilates, Tai Chi, yoga and anything else that you can think of.

If you would like a physiotherapist to set you up for success with a winning gym routine, book an appointment at PhysioWest online or by calling 8352 3582 and get on track to achieving your goals!

Physio West | Core Exercise Class | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.Physio West | Stretch Exercise Class | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.Physio West | Mile End Clinic | Physiotherapy, exercise therapy and massage services in Adelaide, South Australia.

Written by Spencer Davis